Stereoscope Technology

This is an overview of all the technology used for this huge project. We will add more information as we are still busy developing while approaching our deadline.

Hardware

In our former projects we had different approaches to tackle the problem of addressing so many lamps within a building. For our first installation Blinkenlights we used simple mechanical relais to create a monochrome screen. For the sequel Arcade we improved the technology and developed electronic relais that enabled us to do greyscaling on the building.

For Toronto City Hall we felt we needed a fresh approach due to the sheer number of windows (960) and the fact that we had to deal with a building in full operation on almost every floor we targeted. So we came up with a system using wireless distribution using remote-controlled dimmers.

Wireless Dimmers: WDIM

So we went ahead and developed a dimmer from the ground up based on the OpenBeacon free active 2.4 GHz wireless technology. One of these boxes is attached to each lamp in the building. We call these dimmers WDIM.

You find the technical background specification on WDIM in the OpenBeacon Wiki.

Wireless Control: WMCU

The wireless dimmers (we call them WDIM) receive their commands from the so-called Wireless Matrix Control Unit (WMCU) that itself is attached to an Ethernet-based network that is connecting all the floors in both of the towers. This is of course also based on the OpenBeacon free active 2.4 GHz wireless technology.

You find the technical background specification on WMCU in the OpenBeacon Wiki as well.

The Software

We also wrote a whole bunch of new software for Stereoscope while we also reused most of what we had developed for Blinkenlights and Arcade. We'll tell you more about that soon.